We’re Working for You!

April 25, 2019 Edition

Here’s an update on some recent OCBC activities:

  1. OCBC contacted the City of Laguna Hills requesting signage at the intersection of northbound Avenida de Carlota at Los Alisos Blvd to indicate where bicyclist should stop to trigger a stop light change. OCBC also requested that the light stay green long enough for bicyclist to safely cross busy Los Alisos Blvd. Map of This Intersection. The city responded with a plan to install a “bike button” to change the traffic signal for bicyclists when requested.
  2. Thanked the City of Tustin for their commitment to OCBC to replace five drainage grates along Irvine Blvd that could catch bicycle wheels.
  3. OCBC recommended to the City of Lake Forest changes to the area of Cook’s Corner that are dangerous for bicyclist. Map of This Area
  4. Thanked the City of Irvine for filling in a valve cover in the middle of a street. It was a hazard to bicyclists.
  5. Attended an OC Parks Commission meeting to discuss the long-promised Class 1 trail through Peter’s Canyon Regional Park. Unfortunately, although regional parks are supposed to serve all Orange County residents, OC Parks Commission decided to relegate Peter’s Canyon to be a publicly funded private reserve for the neighbors of the park. This leaves a gaping hole in the Class 1 trail that was has been planned for decades to run from the Orange County mountains to the sea. OCBC is considering all options to revise plans for Peter’s Canyon Regional Park so the plans will serve all Orange County residents.
  6. OCBC contacted Orange County Public Works, Orange County Parks and the City of Tustin with serious concerns and objections to bicycle infrastructure plans meant to bypass the Peter’s Canyon Regional Park.

The Orange County Bicycle Coalition’s mission is “To promote bicycling as an everyday means of transportation and recreation”. Join the OCBC Today!

Make Video Evidence Ticketable by Police – the Movement

If you video a tailgating motorist blasting the horn at you, revving their engine, maybe “brush passing” inches from your elbow, that’s assault.
And if that motorist actually hits you or your bicycle, that’s battery.

CaptureBut if that callous and aggressive attack on you isn’t witnessed by a police officer, that video evidence cannot be used– legally– to cite or arrest the perpetrator.
Here’s the site of the organization behind the movement to change things:

http://www.3footcycling.com/castro-valley-california-incident-bike-mounted-video-deconstruction-and-analysis/

“We are very happy to announce that our mobilization and pressure resulted in a Summit at CHP Golden Gate Division Headquarters with Chief Ernie Sanchez, a key representative from CHP Headquarters, key staff members from CHP GGD, 3FootCycling.com’s Founder, Craig Davis, and our member cyclist. It was a respectful and productive meeting where CHP stated that they are prohibited by law from citing reckless driving or 3 Foot law violations using bicycle mounted video evidence. They also said that our persistent pressure forced an internal review and learning process that that they appreciated.”

Get involved on the national level here: 3footcycling.com

You Can Report Bad or Hostile Drivers

 You don’t have to let careless or belligerent drivers get away with it.  For years the Department of Motor Vehicles has had a program to get bad drivers off the road. Click on this form to open a PDF you can fill out to start the process.

Driver Complaint - thumbIntended primarily to report elderly, blind, or impaired drivers whose conditions have deteriorated to the point they may be a threat to others, this procedure causes the DMV contact the individual to prove they still qualify to be licensed to drive. Increasingly now, bicyclists are using this process to turn in hostile drivers, those who buzz-pass in violation of the 3-Foot Passing law, or make dangerous “right hook” or “left cross” turns which put them in jeopardy.

Rude, careless, and hostile often equals assault. Bicyclists are fully franchised users of the road. Motorists must respect your space, pass only when safe to do so, and at least show you the same courtesy they do other motorists.

Polite honks are one thing; long, drawn out horn use delivered at the last second or while sitting on your wheel is another. It’s pure intimidation, a threat delivered from a 4,000 lb. vehicle– it qualifies as “assault with a deadly weapon.”

The DMV Driver Reevaluation form covers that.

But will it get results? Lawyers familiar with the DMV’s process say it will, eventually. A driver properly identified on the form will be contacted and informed their behavior on the road warrants an interview. The process is as anonymous as the DMV can keep it– your identity should not be revealed but the nature of your complaint will be.

“Acts violent or aggressive while driving,” “Fails to react to traffic signals, other cars, or pedestrians, etc.,”  “Turns in front of other cars [or bicycles].” When you check these boxes and add additional comments on the form you should get a DMV officer’s attention.

And multiple complaints filed on the same driver will have real impact.

The driver’s name is not essential. Contrary to the asterisk on the form, a complete license plate number and vehicle description can trigger the review process. If you post video evidence of hostile or reckless behavior on line, be sure to include a link on the form. That’s another reason to pack a GoPro or Fly6 camera.

The California Association of Bicycle Organizations and committees within Caltrans are examining the form and reporting process to make it more responsive to pedestrians and bicyclists. We’ll update this column as news becomes available.

Cycling Savvy Training in Irvine, June 19th/20th

Register Here

OCBC is proud to announce our second CyclingSavvy course of 2015 on June 19th and June 20th in Irvine.

CyclingSavvy is a program of American Bicycling Education Association, Inc. (ABEA). The course teaches the principles of Mindful Bicycling:

  • empowerment to act as confident, equal road users;
  • strategies for safe, stress-free integrated cycling;
  • tools to read and problem-solve any traffic situation or road configuration.

The course is offered in three 3-hour components: a bike-handling session, a classroom session and an on-road tour. The classroom and bike-handling sessions may be taken individually, the road tour requires the other two as a pre-requisite.

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