A Slice of Huntington Beach

As Newport’s neighbor to the north, Huntington Beach shares the “road of dreams”, better known locally as PCH or Coast Highway, or formally known as The Pacific Coast Trail.

Garden Grove edged out Huntington Beach in a tie with Newport Beach for “bronze” or third place in the most dangerous cities to ride a bike in the county leaving HB to “improve” to 4th place.

10 bike riders were killed with 1,055 injured since 2001.

The deadly streets of Huntington Beach:

HB Deadly StreetsRT 1, or PCH and Brookhurst are two roads where half of fatal rider collisions occurred.

The most current Huntington Beach records are from 7/28/12 which shows at least some county records are making it to the CHP.

Abbreviations used:

FTS = Failed to Stop, FTY = Failed to Yield, FTR = Far to the Right

And now for the pie charts!

HB Dead

According to the assigned fault as shown, bike riders were responsible for their own death 49% of the time although 20% of the fatality’s fault was undetermined so it could range as high as 69% .

Rider faults seem evenly split until you notice that 2 are due to BUI or Bicycling Under the Influence, with another DUI/BUI listed in the “unknown” category making 3 riders dead thanks to the impairment of some intoxicant.

Drivers in  Huntington Beach failed to stop, signal, or drive on the right side of the road resulting in another 3 riders dead.

HB Injured

Riders were responsible for just under 75% of their injuries by colliding with other vehicles.

Just like in Santa Ana and Garden Grove, riding on the wrong side of the road, or not far enough to the right to suit the citing officer is the predominant cause of collisions. Given the tourist factor and beach-side flavor it is more likely that wrong way riders aware of the proper rules of the road, choose to ignore them to make their way about HB.  Better signage and road treatments like sharrows could help direct riders to “go with the flow”.  Selective enforcement actions also would help reduce rider collisions perhaps by issuing warnings, then citations for repeat (observed) offenders.

Certainly an educational outreach is needed and in fact, rumor has it that a class is scheduled this coming November 15th with the on-road portion on the 17th at the Rodgers Senior Center. We could not confirm the class schedule or registration because it’s not listed on the calendar as yet, and at press time the online registration system was out of service.  Should things get back to normal, online registration will be available at www.hbsands.org. Check the City’s calendar for updates, or see the class announcement here.

When is it safe to ride?

The following chart is a compilation of injuries as they occurred in 3 hour segments over the course of a year.

HB Collision Time

One third of collisions occur between 6 a.m. and noon, with 50% happening from noon till 6 p.m.  which might indicate too much sun and suds for clear riding judgement. 17% of collisions happen from 6 p.m. to midnight, while the hours from midnight to 6 a.m. account for the rest at less than 3%.

Types of Collisions:

Shown here are the types of collisions for Huntington Beach:

HB Collisions

With almost half of injury collisions occurring due to riders riding “against the flow”, we see an almost perfect correlation to the expected outcome with 53% of riders being broadsided.  Again, it would be wrong to to notice broadside collisions, with a predominate wrong way riding to infer that riders are getting broadsided because they aren’t where they’re expected to be, as drivers aren’t looking for traffic coming from the right. That would be just wrong so we won’t do it.

Huntington Beach has a tough challenge to make the streets safer for everyone, from the busy tourist beach scene, to the bustling inner streets of the city. We’re encouraged that they are almost midway through the development of a draft City Bike Plan, however much can be done before the plan is complete to mitigate behavioral causes for collisions as noted above.

We welcome working with city and county staff and other agencies to develop an effective outreach program to better meet the safety needs of all bike riders in the city.

A Slice of Garden Grove

Garden Grove edged out Huntington Beach in a tie with Newport Beach for “bronze” or third place in the most dangerous cities to ride a bike in the County.

11 bike riders were killed with 583 injured since 2001.

The deadly streets of Garden Grove:

GG Deadly StreetsNo street  stands out as having a majority of collisions except Brookhurst and Garden Grove Blvd with 2 and 3 fatalities respectively across their length.

The most current Garden Grove records are from 12/29/11 which is laughable considering the current date of 10/25/12.

On the other hand, maybe there was nothing to report!

As much as we may wish that no collisions occurred between then and now, somehow we just know that the reality will sadly prove otherwise. It would be interesting to know the reason why and if someone want to leave an anonymous tip to the editor we’ll start a discreet investigation.

Abbreviations used:

FTS = Failed to Stop, FTY = Failed to Yield, FTR = Far to the Right

And now for the pie charts!

 GG Dead

According to the assigned fault as shown, bike riders were responsible for their own death 55% of the time. The major rider fault is riding on the wrong side of the road. For the second time, Bicycling Under the Influence makes an appearance accounting for 18% of the fatalities, although the technical nuance between a citation for 23152 and 21200 are too fine for this writer’s eyes to discern. With almost one third, or 27% of collisions in the “unknown / not stated” category, even though 1/3 of those were attributed to speeding by at least one of the parties in the fatal collision, perhaps being able to figure out who was at fault for the collision is trickier in Garden Grove than in other cities.

Since 27% could swing either way, it’s feasible that bike riders could be 82% at fault which is terrible, but better than Santa Ana’s 92%. Drivers in Garden Grove failing to stop or failing to yield contributed the remaining 18 or 45% depending on the final assignment of fault.

GG Injured

Riders again were responsible for over 75% of their injuries by colliding with other vehicles.

Just like in Santa Ana, riding on the wrong side of the road is the predominant cause of collisions. Given the demographic makeup of Garden Grove, could cultural traditions or mores also be in play for this behavior? Perhaps better enforcement of the rules of the road to violators is in order.

Certainly an educational outreach is needed and we look forward to partnering with agencies to work with to improve the understanding of the rules of the road.

According to the CHP population index, Garden Grove could have more than twice the population of Newport Beach, so maybe it’s commendable that despite the greater number of people in the city, fatalities are on par with a city half its size (at this point in time),  while bike riders injured in Garden Grove are less than Newport Beach at 583 and 740 riders injured respectively.

So how can the 2 cities be tied for 3rd in a race given their population differences and injury counts? The simple answer is the kill count – both are the same, and without an obfuscating rosy board of tourism or chamber of commerce statistical sleight of hand, this absolute number is the final arbiter at this time.

Yes it is possible to have parallel rankings for death and injury, and it is possible to add death and injury totals to create an index to rank the cities, however, indexing by absolute numbers of riders killed and providing the resultant data on injuries as a byproduct speeds our delivery of actionable material to get the death count down across the county.

When is it safe to ride?

The following chart is a compilation of injuries as they occurred in 3 hour segments over the course of a year.

GG Collision Time

One quarter of collisions occur between 3 and 6 p.m. but the hours before 3 and after 6 indicate a 19% rise and a 18% fall from the 25% peak. The morning commute is easily spotted with 16% of collisions happening from 6-9 a.m.

Two thirds of collisions occur in the 12 hours from noon to midnight,  which also might indicate bike riders not being visible to others on the road, and it is close to Santa Ana’s 72%. Is there a cross commute going on here?

Types of Collisions:

Shown here are the types of collisions for Garden Grove:

GG Collisions

Again, it would be wrong to to notice broadside collisions, with a predominate wrong way riding with the majority of collisions happening from noon to midnight by infering that riders are getting broadsided because they can’t be seen and drivers aren’t looking for traffic coming from the right. That would be just wrong so we won’t do it.

Garden Grove has a tough challenge to make the streets safer for everyone, and if they could get their data records in to Sacramento in a timely fashion, we would know sooner whether actions taken have had their desired effect, and if not, what course of action is best suited for the problem at hand.

While we can’t help move their data faster, we do welcome working with city and county staff and other agencies to develop an effective outreach program to better meet the safety needs of all bike riders in the city.

A Slice of Anaheim

Keeping our tradition of “slicing the Orange”, we present the latest statistics for Anaheim.

Anaheim is the 2nd worst city for bike collision fatality and injury in the county.

With 13 dead and 1,048 injured since 2001, we sought to unravel a common denominator.

Anaheim Deadliest Streets

Anaheim Deadliest Streets

Here are the roads where bike riders were killed:

Even the happiest place on earth is not immune to deadly collisions as seen by the fatality created by a speeding motorist at Ball and Cast Place in Disneyland last year.

The latest records from Anaheim are from 2/24/12.

Abbreviations used:

FTS = Failed to Stop, FTY = Failed to Yield, FTR = Far to the Right

And now for the pie charts!

Anaheim Killed by Fault

Once again, bike riders are their own worst enemy according to the authorities. Failing to stop, riding on the wrong side of the road, and failing to yield are 3 simple things these riders should have done and had they done so, there would be more bikes on the road today. After all, how often do you hear someone saying, “I wish there were more cars on the road!

Motorists were also guilty of carelessness resulting in an additional needless loss of life by speeding, and generally failing to maintain or exercise proper control of their vehicles.

Bike riders in Anaheim must really like pain because according to the data, they are responsible for over 80% of collisions with motorists. Now I have yet to meet one cyclist who actively looks to get into a collision with a car, truck, or tank, so I would treat these numbers with some suspicion.

Anaheim Injured

If perception is reality, then this reality needs to change and quick. With the 2nd highest death count and 2nd highest injury count, the cycling population of Anaheim is doomed to quick extinction if they keep this up. The causes presented by the data are mostly behavioral, so here’s a refresher:

  • Ride with the direction of traffic
  • Stop at and signs and signals
  • Be Polite, wave as you yield the right of way (a smile always helps)
  • Signal your intentions, let people know what you plan to do
  • Use front and rear lights and reflective clothing to be seen better

Five simple things that you can count on one hand. Master these and watch Anaheim switch sides from one of the worst, to one of the best cities to ride in. It all starts with you.

Yes, there are infrastructure issues as well. For this reason, roadway treatments in one city need to be coordinated with the the adjacent city, and so on. In fact, we looked at all the roadways involved in collisions and found that 20% of all collisions happened on 5 roads. Certainly some room for improvement there, can you guess which roads / streets they are?

An active and engaged Bicycle Action Committee is needed for this city – stat.

Who is willing to rise to the call?

Let us know who you are and we’ll help guide the process transforming Anaheim into a cycle-safe place to ride.

Thanks for your support.

A Slice of Newport Beach

Continuing our presentation of bike rider safety, we present the latest statistics for Newport Beach. We combined the previous charts from other cities, but here we separate injuries from deaths in two charts.

The 1st quarter of 2011 data is almost complete, and the rest of the year continues to be updated.
2012 data is slowly being processed from other counties, but the latest we have for Newport is from August 2011. The NPB PD has not been responsive to our repeated requests for current information, so we’ll show what we have now, and maybe in a year or two the charts will reflect what they input to the system yesterday.

Abbreviations used:

FTS = Failed to Stop, FTY = Failed to Yield, FTR = Far to the Right

And now for the pie charts!

NPB Dead Cyclist CollisionsThe chart represents the 11 fatalities that occurred in this city up to August of 2011. The color indicates who was at fault for the collision as determined by the appropriate authorities.  Newport Beach enjoys the dubious distinction of earning a “Bronze” in the deadliest city category of county competition with Anaheim and Santa Ana earning “Silver” and “Gold” respectively.

Cyclists ignored traffic signals and signs to their demise by failing to stop or exceeding the speed limit and loosing control.

40% of drivers’ fault for killing someone on a bicycle was do to being under the influence, and that’s for those who were caught.

In September, the Daily Pilot ran a story about Newport and bike accidents. While we note that the reporters were able to get current  data from the NPB PD, what the reporters left out of the story is shown below: OTS-NPB

From the California Office of Traffic Safety, the above chart is for their “latest” data from 2010.

Despite the abysmal safety record for anything not on four wheels, Newport Beach earned the “gold medal” by placing 1st from 103 cities of similar size for alcohol involvement in collisions in the city. The good news for those that like to drive under the influence is that Newport Beach ranked next to last in enforcement as can be seen in their arrest percentage and ranking.

True, this data is from 2010 and things may have changed for the better, which is why we asked in the first place.

NPB Injured Cyclist CollisionsThis chart reflects the cyclist injuries within the city. Newport rides mid-pack at 5th in the top 10 cities injurious to your riding pleasure.

Clearly cyclists are at fault for the majority of collisions in Newport by riding on the wrong side of the road, not far enough to the right, failing to yield or stop, and failing to, CVC22109: “stop or suddenly decrease the speed of a vehicle on a highway without first giving an appropriate signal”.

Bicycles can be stopped faster than a motor vehicle, which makes us wonder; were the drivers following too close? Typically the presumption of fault is on the rear-most motorist  in a chain reaction collision. So 101 bike riders stopped as conditions warranted (stop signs, lights, being cut-off, etc.), yet were found “at fault” for failing to give an appropriate slowing or stopping signal?

By now you probably want to know where all the action took place.

Here is an overview of where the cyclist fatalities occurred:

NPB Death Map

The red dots are in the CHP system, while the orange are not.

Here’s the map showing where the injuries took place:

NPB Injuries

The size of the dots have nothing to do with the counts of injury at a particular location. Of interest in this map is the dilemma faced by residents or tourists of the peninsula. Hard to get into, out of, and round about on two wheels it seems. Also interesting is the high count of collisions on Irvine /Campus close to Harbor High and UCI, while no surprise at the “gauntlet” that is Corona del Mar.

Curious about the state of PCH since Newport Beach garnered responsibility for the stretch from Jamboree to Newport Coast, we tried to get data going back to 1996 to provide a balanced perspective on how the Corona del Mar Business Improvement plan is working out for people on bikes traveling through the “improved” area. Unable to get the data in a timely fashion we present:

Cyclist Collision Injuries

This chart shows the number of bike riders injured in collisions in Newport Beach from 2001-2008. This time- frame is chosen to reflect 4 years on either side of the control or “improvement” of PCH.  While things may have improved for the businesses of Corona del Mar, it appears people on two wheels paid the price.

Since we cannot go back we must go forward. The next chart shows a dramatic drop from ’09-10, which the tourism board probably found encouraging. Another drop in ’11 gives the impression that all is well until the realization hits that there’s still another 2 quarters to feed into the chart! Even so, doubling the currently recorded 26 injuries to 52 would put the city on track to have the lowest injury rate since 2003!

Cyclist Collisions in NPB 01-12

Is there data manipulation going on behind the scenes? There’s no way to know, and people seemed conditioned to accept a 2 year time delay in actionable, potentially lifesaving information.

Consider: a policeman fills out a collision report on his handheld wireless gps gizmo, and beams the collision record back to the department complete with pictures. The collision summaries are batched to the state. Minutes later, a collision request occurs at the local station. The request is honored within seconds, yet to receive a response from the state will take 2 years? If someone can explain how this makes sense, saves lives, time, and money we’d love to hear it.

Thanks for your support!