A Slice of Irvine

After reviewing data charts from the upcoming Alliance for Biking and Walking conference in Long Beach, we noticed that while full of facts and figures, we couldn’t find specifics as seen below:

Irvine01-12 Pie

A Slice of Irvine

This chart shows the fault of most cyclist injuries and death to be that of the cyclist as determined by the appropriate authority. Of the 6 fatalities and 445 injuries represented here, you may use the specific CVC code such as 21453=”fail to stop” to get a clearer picture of the specific action on the part of each party. In contrast, there were only 2 pedestrian injuries recorded for the same time-frame, so despite the trend in other cities, pedestrians have an easier time of it than cyclists in Irvine.

Why pick on Irvine?

We’re not – really!
Irvine is one of the most bike friendly cities in the county offering multiple class1 and class 2 cycle paths, and is basically flat. It also happens to be where we are holding our next cycling seminar and we encourage you to attend.

As can clearly be seen, cyclists are their own worst enemy, and through our classroom and road skills portion of the course, you will gain the knowledge of how to avoid becoming a statistic, and have greater confidence when on the road. This class has sold out the last two months, and seating is limited.

If you’re not attending any of the great conferences in Long Beach next week, sign up now!

One might wonder if alcohol played a part in the above injury and death chart, and the answer is yes. There were 12 alcohol involved injuries but no fatalities. 6 were on the part of the cyclist, 2 on the part of the motorist, and 4 that could go either way because the field was marked “not stated”. So if you think it’s safe to drink and ride, think again and sober up before rolling out.

The OCBC uses information like this to better understand the underlying cause and issues related to cyclist injury and death throughout the county. With this level of understanding, we can make informed  suggestions to city planners or other interested parties on how to minimize cyclist conflict in the county.

Ride strong – ride smart – ride safe!

Lake Forest, Irvine & Alton

From the news desk and of concern to all cyclists that enjoy the Trabuco / Irvine traverse. Mark your calendar, for June 20th marks the opening of Alton across Irvine into north Lake Forest.

What this means is more cars coming from every which direction at high rates of speed. There is also a new gore point to be careful of. A right turn lane for west bound traffic has been made to allow cars to turn right from Alton onto Irvine without stopping, and they won’t be looking for you as you head towards Irvine from Lake Forest.

Read about the opening ceremony here.

Sure would be nice to let cyclists be the first to officially ride down the fresh pavement.

Any cycling advocates in Lake Forest?
If so, please contact the editor and let’s see if we can stir up some interest.

In a related note (to more traffic in the area), we read in the OC Register, that Lake Forest has agreed to allow development of 2,400 residential units on 387 acres which will include “At least 20 new neighborhoods with Spanish, Mediterranean and California Eclectic-style homes, condos and apartments.” Watch for grading and construction to begin this September. Another story of the development is in the Lake Forest Patch.

With 12 dead cyclists on the roads of OC in 2011, use extreme caution when approaching this intersection now. Unlike the gore point heading in the other direction on Irvine towards Bake, this one is short to the point of no room for error if the anticipated high volume of traffic materializes. And with at least 2,400 new homes in the area, it won’t be long.

Be careful out there.

OC Rides of Silence – Recap+

The evening of 5/16/2012 marked the 10th annual Ride of Silence (RoS) around the world.
Angelique Martinez, 16, of Oxnard organized a RoS in memory of her brother Anthony, 6, who was struck and killed by a pickup truck last Thanksgiving, was selected by the Ride of Silence board of directors as this years’ “champion and hero”.

Here in Orange County, it marked the 6th for Irvine organized by BCI, and a 1st for San Clemente organized by Sally Guon.

Intrigued as to how to form and organize a RoS,
your reporter contacted Sally to find out.

Perhaps her story will awaken desire and inspire others to do the same
for their cities.

Here are 2 pics of the San Clemente RoS with riders northbound on PCH
taken by OCBCs’ own, Pete Van Nuys:

 

Now in her own words,  the background, the process she went through to make it happen and a message for all that really want to make a difference:
“You can make it happen”.

“My husband and I moved to San Clemente 3 years ago from Plano, Tx. We were friends with Larry Schwartz, whose memory we honored in the first RIDE OF SILENCE originating in Dallas, Texas. Our friend, Chris Phelan, organized the event and over 1,000 people were there to ride silently around White Rock Lake (9.3 miles).

My husband and I are avid cyclists and have ridden many miles in several states. There is always a concern each time we ride that motor vehicles will look for us, respect that we have a right to be on the road too, and that we will be safe in our journey. I shudder each time I learn of someone being killed or injured by a motorist and think it could be me out there?

I wanted to make a difference. I am passionate about bicycle safety for both the rider and the motorist.

I reached out to Chris Phelan and he said these simple words to me, “You can make it happen”. Chris encouraged me to look through the RIDE OF SILENCE  for suggestions on flyers and video I would be able to use. When I researched the website I was impressed by how large the movement had become in 10 years time and how much aide was available to help me organize an event in my home town.

I was very surprised that in all of Orange County there was only one event and that was in Irvine. This seemed an opportunity to me in far south Orange County just because of the volume of cyclists I see in this area. I had 1000 flyers printed and posted flyers all over bicycle shops, coffee shops, bagel shops, dentists’ offices, physicians’ offices, basically anywhere I knew cyclist could be found.

I communicated on social media and face to face. I was met with an enthusiastic response and remember all of the stories that were told to me of people who know someone killed or injured while riding their bike. Pete Van Nuys was very inspirational to me here in San Clemente. He is such a bicycle advocate and is wants to get bicycle education out there, especially to our young people learning to ride. Pete met with me and was very helpful to give me suggestions on getting the word out in a bigger way publicly. Pete also suggested a bicycle safety course 101 to me whereby I can be a certified instructor and help educate at the local schools. I’ll be honest, I was not aware this existed. I assured Pete that I will follow through with this course and help educate our young people.

So, in these simple words to those wondering if you can do it. I say
“YOU CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN”!

The first ‘RIDE OF SILENCE’ in the San Clemente area started at the North Beach commuter parking lot and headed west, northwest along the PCH through Capo Beach and along Harbor Drive.

Sally Guon collecting names/emails/memorials from participants

Sally Guon talking to Fred Swegles with OCRegister as participants arrive

Mike Guon details the bike route for the RIDE OF SILENCE

Sally Guon, organizer, reading a tribute for the RIDE OF SILENCE

Cyclist making their way through Capo Beach/Doheny State Beach

Cyclist riding through Dana Point Harbor towards Kayak Beach

(photographs by Julie Springer-Anderson, San Juan Capistrano)

Our turnaround was at Kayak Beach and back again along PCH. There were fewer than 20 people in total and included people from San Clemente, Dana Point and San Juan Capistrano.

For a first event this size was quite manageable in terms of getting cyclist thru the traffic lights in one cycle. As we gathered together, I registered the riders with name, e-mail address and asked for the names of persons they were riding in memory of or those who have been injured. I gave each participant a reflective ROS sticker for their car or bicycle while my husband reviewed the course route we would be taking. I read the ROS poem and led the silent ride while my husband stayed in the back of our group. Safety was our number one concern and we did stay inside the barricades where permissible. Traffic was light on our outbound but increased as we returned home.

Motorists were very respectful and we encountered only one motorist trying to make a right hand turn in the middle of our group as we proceeded through our green light. My husband reached out and put his hand on her car to get her attention and beacon her to stop for us (also on her right).

We look forward to this being the foundation of many years to come. I personally wear a bicycle kit from TEAM CARD  which is very colorful and states the three foot law all over it. Somehow I feel I’m educating motorists while wearing it.

Most importantly we want to bring worldwide attention to motorists sharing the road with cyclists, especially as the number of cyclists increase; so should motorist alertness to us on the roadways.”

Thank you Sally, and Thanks to All Riders and Participants in the Inaugural Ride of Silence in San Clemente.